Lupin Research

Lupins belong to the legume family and encompass a wide range of species that vary dramatically in phenotype. Lupinus luteus is grown in the Mediterranean region as well as in South American countries such as Chile. It is increasingly enticing as an agricultural product for a few reasons. As a legume its rhizobium-root relationship, allows it to grow in ecological conditions unfavorable to many other crops. Furthermore, its high protein and oil content make it a welcomed choice for livestock feed. However, consumption of beans from lupin is not agreeable with the palate or digestive track of all animals. This is partially due to high alkaloid content. There is currently interest in creating a form suitable to supplement the carnivorous diet of Salmon, a top import of Chile. Genotyping by sequencing is a technology that can identify multiple SNPs and and genetic markers in a large amount of samples in parallel. Identification of these SNPs will enable researchers and breeders to identify QTLs that will allow them to exploit beneficial characteristics for Lupinus luteus

A recent EST paper of Lupin


Current Research

Lupines belong to the legume family and encompass a wide range of species that vary dramatically in phenotype. Lupinus albus is grown in the Mediterranean region as well as in South American countries such as Chile. It is becoming increasingly enticing as an agricultural product. As a legume its rhizobium-root relationship, allows it to grow in ecological conditions unfavorable to many other crops. Furthermore, its high protein and oil content make it a welcomed choice for livestock feed. However, consumption of beans from lupines is not agreeable with the palate or digestive track of all animals. This is partially due to high alkaloid content. There is currently interest in creating a form suitable to supplement the carnivorous diet of Salmon, a top import of Chile. Genotyping by sequencing is a technology that can identify multiple SNPs and genetic markers in a large amount of samples in parallel. Identification of these SNPs will enable researchers and breeders to identify QTLs that will allow them to exploit beneficial characteristics forLupinus albus
 
192 samples of Lupinus albus were gathered from across Chile. These sample will undergo genome reduction by the genotyping by sequencing protocol. SNP calling can then be performed on the sequencing data of the enriched regions of the lupine samples. From the SNPs, markers can be developed for population associated markers. Furthermore, SNPS may be used to identify QTLs.